"Great Expectations"
by Charles Dickens

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     I have reason to think that Joe's intellects were brightened by the encounter they had passed through, and that on our way to Pumblechook's he invented a subtle and deep design. My reason is to be found in what took place in Mr. Pumblechook's parlor: where, on our presenting ourselves, my sister sat in conference with that detested seedsman.

     "Well?" cried my sister, addressing us both at once. "And what's happened to you? I wonder you condescend to come back to such poor society as this, I am sure I do!"


     "Miss Havisham," said Joe, with a fixed look at me, like an effort of remembrance, "made it wery partick'ler that we should give her--were it compliments or respects, Pip?"

     "Compliments," I said.

     "Which that were my own belief," answered Joe; "her compliments to Mrs. J. Gargery--"

     "Much good they'll do me!" observed my sister; but rather gratified too.

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