"Jane Eyre"
by Charlotte Bronte

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     And she produced from her pocket a most housewifely bunch of keys, and delivered them to the servant.

     "Now, then, draw nearer to the fire," she continued. "You've brought your luggage with you, haven't you, my dear?"

     "Yes, ma'am."

     "I'll see it carried into your room," she said, and bustled out.


     "She treats me like a visitor," thought I. "I little expected such a reception; I anticipated only coldness and stiffness: this is not like what I have heard of the treatment of governesses; but I must not exult too soon."

     She returned; with her own hands cleared her knitting apparatus and a book or two from the table, to make room for the tray which Leah now brought, and then herself handed me the refreshments. I felt rather confused at being the object of more attention than I had ever before received, and, that too, shown by my employer and superior; but as she did not herself seem to consider she was doing anything out of her place, I thought it better to take her civilities quietly.

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