"Jane Eyre"
by Charlotte Bronte

  Previous Page   Next Page   Speaker On

     I understood her very well, for I had been accustomed to the fluent tongue of Madame Pierrot.

     "I wish," continued the good lady, "you would ask her a question or two about her parents: I wonder if she remembers them?"

     "Adele," I inquired, "with whom did you live when you were in that pretty clean town you spoke of?"

     "I lived long ago with mama; but she is gone to the Holy Virgin. Mama used to teach me to dance and sing, and to say verses. A great many gentlemen and ladies came to see mama, and I used to dance before them, or to sit on their knees and sing to them: I liked it. Shall I let you hear me sing now?"


     She had finished her breakfast, so I permitted her to give a specimen of her accomplishments. Descending from her chair, she came and placed herself on my knee; then, folding her little hands demurely before her, shaking back her curls and lifting her eyes to the ceiling, she commenced singing a song from some opera. It was the strain of a forsaken lady, who, after bewailing the perfidy of her lover, calls pride to her aid; desires her attendant to deck her in her brightest jewels and richest robes, and resolves to meet the false one that night at a ball, and prove to him, by the gaiety of her demeanour, how little his desertion has affected her.

Text provided by Project Gutenberg.
Audio by LibriVox.org and performed by Elizabeth Klett.
Flash mp3 player by Jeroen Wijering. (cc) some rights reserved.
Web page presentation by LoudLit.org.