"Pride and Prejudice"
by Jane Austen

  Previous Page   Next Page   Speaker Off

     "Very well. We now come to the point. Your mother insists upon your accepting it. Is it not so, Mrs. Bennet?"

     "Yes, or I will never see her again."

     "An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do."

     Elizabeth could not but smile at such a conclusion of such a beginning, but Mrs. Bennet, who had persuaded herself that her husband regarded the affair as she wished, was excessively disappointed.


     "What do you mean, Mr. Bennet, in talking this way? You promised me to insist upon her marrying him."

     "My dear," replied her husband, "I have two small favours to request. First, that you will allow me the free use of my understanding on the present occasion; and secondly, of my room. I shall be glad to have the library to myself as soon as may be."

Text provided by Project Gutenberg.
Audio by LibriVox and performed by Karen Savage.
Web page presentation by LoudLit.org.