"A Tale of Two Cities"
by Charles Dickens

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     "Is it not impressive, Mr. Darnay?" asked Lucie. "Sometimes, I have sat here of an evening, until I have fancied--but even the shade of a foolish fancy makes me shudder to-night, when all is so black and solemn--"

     "Let us shudder too. We may know what it is."

     "It will seem nothing to you. Such whims are only impressive as we originate them, I think; they are not to be communicated. I have sometimes sat alone here of an evening, listening, until I have made the echoes out to be the echoes of all the footsteps that are coming by-and-bye into our lives."


     "There is a great crowd coming one day into our lives, if that be so," Sydney Carton struck in, in his moody way.

     The footsteps were incessant, and the hurry of them became more and more rapid. The corner echoed and re-echoed with the tread of feet; some, as it seemed, under the windows; some, as it seemed, in the room; some coming, some going, some breaking off, some stopping altogether; all in the distant streets, and not one within sight.

     "Are all these footsteps destined to come to all of us, Miss Manette, or are we to divide them among us?"

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