"A Tale of Two Cities"
by Charles Dickens

  Previous Page   Next Page   Speaker On

     But for the latter inconvenience, the carriage probably would not have stopped; carriages were often known to drive on, and leave their wounded behind, and why not? But the frightened valet had got down in a hurry, and there were twenty hands at the horses' bridles.

     "What has gone wrong?" said Monsieur, calmly looking out.

     A tall man in a nightcap had caught up a bundle from among the feet of the horses, and had laid it on the basement of the fountain, and was down in the mud and wet, howling over it like a wild animal.


     "Pardon, Monsieur the Marquis!" said a ragged and submissive man, "it is a child."

     "Why does he make that abominable noise? Is it his child?"

     "Excuse me, Monsieur the Marquis--it is a pity--yes."

     The fountain was a little removed; for the street opened, where it was, into a space some ten or twelve yards square. As the tall man suddenly got up from the ground, and came running at the carriage, Monsieur the Marquis clapped his hand for an instant on his sword-hilt.

Text provided by Project Gutenberg.
Audio by LiteralSystems, performed by Jane Aker and supported by Gordon W. Draper.
Flash mp3 player by Jeroen Wijering. (cc) some rights reserved.
Web page presentation by LoudLit.org.