"A Tale of Two Cities"
by Charles Dickens

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     The picture produced an immense sensation in the little crowd; but all eyes, without comparing notes with other eyes, looked at Monsieur the Marquis. Perhaps, to observe whether he had any spectre on his conscience.

     "Truly, you did well," said the Marquis, felicitously sensible that such vermin were not to ruffle him, "to see a thief accompanying my carriage, and not open that great mouth of yours. Bah! Put him aside, Monsieur Gabelle!"


     Monsieur Gabelle was the Postmaster, and some other taxing functionary united; he had come out with great obsequiousness to assist at this examination, and had held the examined by the drapery of his arm in an official manner.

     "Bah! Go aside!" said Monsieur Gabelle.

     "Lay hands on this stranger if he seeks to lodge in your village to-night, and be sure that his business is honest, Gabelle."

     "Monseigneur, I am flattered to devote myself to your orders."

     "Did he run away, fellow?--where is that Accursed?"

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